THE PINEAPPLE MEALYBUG COMPLEX; TAXONOMY, DISTRIBUTION AND HOST RELATIONSHIPS

John W. Beardsley
Pineapple mealybugs (PM) associated with wilt disease are mostly members of the Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell) species complex, endemic to the Neotropical region, and prior to 1959 were all lumped under that name. In Hawaii, observed biological differences between pink and gray "strains" of PM led to discovery of taxonomic characters that enabled taxonomic separation, and the gray, bisexual form was recognized as a distinct species, D. neobrevipes Beardsley. Additional species closely related to it are known from pineapple in the neotropics. The pink PM was widely spread on propagative material and alternate hosts prior to World War II and now occurs virtually everywhere pineapple is grown. Two forms of pink PM exist which may be sibling species, one bisexual and one theletokous. Gray PM has expanded its geographical range extensively since WW II, but is still unknown in pineapple growing areas of Africa, Asia, and Australia. Both pink and gray PMs are polyphagous and often infest other tropical crops such as bananas. Pink PM infests perennial grasses, including sugarcane, but gray PM has not been found on grass.
Beardsley, John W. (1993). THE PINEAPPLE MEALYBUG COMPLEX; TAXONOMY, DISTRIBUTION AND HOST RELATIONSHIPS. Acta Hortic. 334, 383-386
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.334.40
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.334.40

Acta Horticulturae