EFFECTS OF FUMIGATION AND MULCHING ON YIELD OF RIPE TOMATOES FOR THE FRESH MARKET IN LIBERIA

Th.G. Hart
The tomato is popular in many parts of Africa and Liberians, for example, have repeatedly shown a preference for tomatoes over all other vegetables except staple vegetables like cassava, sweet potato leaves and watermelon, when it is available (Hart, 1968–1970).

The consumption of processed tomato products, particularly paste, is increasing in many African countries and efforts should continue to achieve local economic production of this food to replace imports from Europe and the United States. Some success has recently been achieved in Nigeria, since that country has now placed a total embargo on the importation of tomato products.

Unfortunately, tomato production in the tropics and particularly at the lower elevations, is surrounded by numerous problems. Most prevalent among these are several devastating soil-borne diseases, poor fruit set due to insufficient diurnal temperature fluctuation at certain altitudes, "Fruit Fly" and other insect pests, foliar diseases and yield depression due to relatively short photoperiods. Most of these problems have been reviewed elsewhere, Hart & Sieh (1965a) (1965b), Hart (1966), (1971), Mortensen & Bullard (1968), Smith & Cochran (1935), Smith (1935), Tindall (1962), Went & Cooper (1945), Winters & Miskimen (1967) and Wittwer & Teuben (1956).

The work presented in this paper is directed towards a reduction of the incidence of soil-borne pathogens in tomato plants which is frequently a serious and limiting factor affecting tomato production in tropical Africa. Particular emphasis was placed on finding suitable control measures for Fusarium infection, "Bacterial Wilt" and nematodes.

Hart, Th.G. (1973). EFFECTS OF FUMIGATION AND MULCHING ON YIELD OF RIPE TOMATOES FOR THE FRESH MARKET IN LIBERIA. Acta Hortic. 33, 105-114
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.33.12
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.33.12

Acta Horticulturae