THE INSECTICIDE RESIDUE PROBLEM IN EXPORT PRODUCTION OF VEGETABLES AND FRUITS IN EAST AFRICA

G. Taksdal
Pesticides have become indispensible to vegetable and fruit production in East Africa. Investigations have proved, however, that some pesticides may, under certain circumstances, cause unwanted residues in food and may present a danger to wildlife. As farmer education and extension efficiency improve, the introduction of modern technology which includes the use of pesticides will increase considerably in professional farming in East Africa. It is therefore essential that the recommended chemical treatments are safe to insecticide users, food consumers and wildlife.

The main problem is the production of vegetables and fruits for export with pesticide residues which are within the tolerances of the importing countries. There is an increasing awareness in many countries of the possible content of pesticide residues in imported foods and imported plant products are checked by residue analyses at an increasing rate. If residues exceeding the mandatory tolerances are found in products from East Africa, difficulties are likely to arise in the export programme.

However, it is impractical to have strict regulations governing insecticide usage in crops scheduled for export and another standard for crops used elsewhere. The safe use of pesticides in export production depends on the application of definite recommendations in all fields of chemical pest control. The problems associated with export crops are, therefore, interwoven with the other aspects of pesticide problems outlined above.

Taksdal, G. (1973). THE INSECTICIDE RESIDUE PROBLEM IN EXPORT PRODUCTION OF VEGETABLES AND FRUITS IN EAST AFRICA. Acta Hortic. 33, 123-130
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.33.15
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.33.15

Acta Horticulturae