THE PERFORMANCE OF TEMPERATE ZONE SWEET CORN CULTIVARS IN UGANDA

R.T. Wurster
Sweet corn is a crop of minor importance in East Africa, although production in Kenya has been increasing in recent years both for processing and consumption as a fresh vegetable. Maize is also widely popular in the form of roasted cobs throughout much of East Africa. Initial trials with sweet corn in Uganda indicated that the crop could have a considerable potential, but very few satisfactory cultivars were available in the country; trials were therefore initiated with the object of selecting suitable cultivars adapted to the environmental conditions of Uganda.

According to Thompson and Kelly (1957) sweet corn normally behaves as a short-day plant since flower production is hastened by daylengths of less than 12 to 14 hours and is delayed by longer days. However, these authors have also stated that length of day does not have a pronounced influence on growth and does not usually limit the areas in which sweet corn can be grown. In Hawaii, Brewbaker et al (1966) conducted 50 cultivar trials with 71 commercial sweet corn hybrids and cultivars. They concluded that none of the "mainland hybrids" were commercially acceptable for year-round production in the tropics, due to the dwarfing effect of short winter daylengths. Wann and Yarnell (1966) noted that sweet corn cultivars and hybrids differ in the way their growth is affected by daylength; only some cultivars are adapted to both relatively short days and high temperatures.

Wurster, R.T. (1973). THE PERFORMANCE OF TEMPERATE ZONE SWEET CORN CULTIVARS IN UGANDA. Acta Hortic. 33, 177-183
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.33.23
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.33.23

Acta Horticulturae