EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS ON THE YIELD AND QUALITY OF GARLIC

Z.E. Abdel-Al
Garlic is an important vegetable crop in Sudan and is also potentially valuable for export to foreign markets. Growers save their own seeds and several different planting methods are in use; some growers plant on the flat while others prefer to plant on ridges. Yields are generally low and there is a lack of uniformity in size and shape of bulbs.

There therefore appears to be an urgent need to evaluate cultivars, determining their performance when planted on ridges as well as on the flat.

Mann (1952) indicated that long days and high temperatures favoured bulb development in the garlic plant. As soon as bulbing commenced, leaf initiation caused and therefore early planting was found to be essential for the production of high yields, so that a large vegetative plant would develop under short photoperiods and cool temperatures. The yield potential of the plants apparently depended on the amount of vegetative growth made before bulbing commenced.

Jones and Mann (1963) showed that bulbing in garlic was also influenced by the temperature to which the dormant cloves or young plants were exposed and exposure to temperatures between 0 and 10°C for 1 or 2 months was observed to hasten subsequent bulbing. Plants which were never subjected to temperatures below 20°C were unlikely to form bulbs, even under long daylengths.

They further indicated that, in most garlic growing areas, the storage of planting stock in unheated sheds and the exposure of established plants to the low temperatures of winter or early spring normally supplied the cold treatment which was necessary for bulbing.

Jones and Mann observed also that plants established in early autumn yielded well but that spring planting, on the other hand, gave low yields since the growing period before bulbing was too short to produce satisfactory yields.

Comin (1942) reported similar results with autumn planted garlic in Ohio.

Mann and Minges (1958) stored the bulbs of 'California Late' garlic for 9 months at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20°C and planted the cloves on April 29th. With the advent of long daylengths and warm field temperatures, the plants from bulbs that had been stored at 0 and 5°C rapidly formed bulbs since the plants did not reach a large size before bulbing, the bulbs were undesirably small.

Abdel-Al, Z.E. (1973). EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS ON THE YIELD AND QUALITY OF GARLIC. Acta Hortic. 33, 43-50
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.33.5
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.33.5

Acta Horticulturae