ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON PHENOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF MANGO - A REVIEW

A.W. Whiley
Low yield of mango (Mangifera indica L.) in the tropics is most often attributed to the failure of floral induction while in subtropical areas flowering is usually reliable but fruit set is often poor. Despite extensive research on factors related to floral induction, flowering and fruit set, few advances have been made towards the resolution of reliable and increased crop production. Environmental stimuli are recognised as having a dominant effect on the yield potential of crops, particularly with respect to their determination of critical events such as the reproductive processes of the plant. The success of these stimuli is related to the sensitivity of the genotype which is ultimately reflected by yield in any given environment.

Recent research has demonstrated strong genotypic x environmental responses within and between the embryonic groups of mango cultivars which can largely account for their relative performance. More specifically, investigations in relation to the effects of low temperature and water deficit on floral induction in mango have been reported. From these there is common agreement that day/night temperatures below 20/15°C will result in floral induction. However, water deficit research with containerised mangoes has failed to induce flowering - a result inconsistent with opinion on floral induction mechanisms in the tropics.

Further evidence supporting cold temperatures during anthesis as a primary cause of the failure of fruit set in subtropical regions has been published and the results are discussed with respect to genotype performance.

Whiley, A.W. (1993). ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON PHENOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF MANGO - A REVIEW. Acta Hortic. 341, 168-176
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.341.17
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.341.17
chlorophyll fluorescence, CO2 assimilation, leaf water potential, Mangifera indica L., paclobutrazol, potassium nitrate, stomatal conductance.

Acta Horticulturae