FACTORS AFFECTING MANGO TREE ARCHITECTURE

S. Ram
For commercial propagation, veneer grafting and inarching are commonly done at 20–25 cm height on seedling root stock. Trees developed by these methods are generally multi-stem with low branching and spreading habit which hinder cultural operations and lower branches are required to be removed in subsequent years to facilitate cultural operations. This causes loss of tree biomass at a productive stage. The close planted trees grow tall and are slender with low fruit yield. The tree architecture and fruiting is further spoiled in clay and clay loam soils with poor drainage coupled with high rainfall and planting density, inter crops, diseases and pests, partial bearing, etc. Thus, mango tree architecture appears to be controlled not only by genotypes but also by grafting height, method of propagation, root stock, planting density, training and pruning, regularity of bearing, inter crop, climate and other environmental factors like- soil and water, diseases and pests, etc.

Mango varieties can be dwarf, semi-dwarf and vigorous for a particular environment. The dwarf and semi-dwarf are spreading, whereas vigorous are generally tall and less spreading. Similarly, cultivars propagated by stone grafting, veneer grafting and inarching grow faster than those propagated by stooling and air layering. Grafting at low height induces low branching and tree is spreading, whereas non-spreading trees are generally those grafted high on root stock but can be further improved by training and pruning. Therefore, the tree architecture in mango can be modified by grafting height, method of propagation, root stock, planting density, training and pruning, regularity of bearing, inter crop, environmental factors etc. on a particular location.

Ram, S. (1993). FACTORS AFFECTING MANGO TREE ARCHITECTURE. Acta Hortic. 341, 177-191
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.341.18
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.341.18

Acta Horticulturae