THE PEST/PREDATOR/PARASITOID COMPLEX ON MANGO INFLORESCENCES IN DOMINICA

A.C. Whitwell
The mango gall midge, Erosomyia mangiferae Felt, is a major pest, destroying flowers and up to 70% of set fruit. Several species of parasitoids are present, the commonest being Aprostocetus sp. (Eulophidae). They are ineffective in controlling the midge infestation.

Lepidopteran flower feeders (mainly Geometridae) are present and can destroy a significant proportion of the florets.

Frankliniella sp. (Thripidae) occur in very large numbers, though the exact nature of damage and loss is unclear. It is frequently preyed upon by the heteropteran Orius sp. (Anthocoridae).

Two phytophagous heteroptera (Miridae) are the fourth and fifth most serious pests, their egg-laying scars apparently acting as foci for infection by pathogens. The Mymarid egg parasitoid Erythmelus sp. is commonly present.

In total about 36 species of arthropods were regularly found on mango flowers. Apart from the major pest/predator/parasitoid complexes mentioned above, the economic importance of the rest was probably minor.

Whitwell, A.C. (1993). THE PEST/PREDATOR/PARASITOID COMPLEX ON MANGO INFLORESCENCES IN DOMINICA. Acta Hortic. 341, 421-432
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.341.47
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.341.47

Acta Horticulturae