THE GENUS MANGIFERA RE-DISCOVERED: THE POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION OF WILD SPECIES TO MANGO CULTIVATION

J.M. Bompard
IBPGR-WWF surveys of the wild mangoes of Borneo and West Malaysia in 1986–88, and extensive study of herbarium mango collections, have resulted in a deeper knowledge of the genus Mangifera. The genus Mangifera and its main natural divisions are briefly presented. Available information on experiments using non-indica species in mango breeding is reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the breeding potential of several noteworthy species which are of particular interest for horticulture and may open new possibilities for mango cultivation.

A significant fraction of this rich genepool, including wild and semi-cultivated species, is currently on the verge of disappearance. Adequate practical measures must be rapidly implemented to ensure the long term survival of mango genetic resources, by both ex situ and in situ conservation. Representative samples of the diversity of selected species other than M.indica need to be established in living collections for investigation.

In order to exploit fully the potential of wild mango species, a cooperative effort involving all those concerned with mango cultivation and conservation must be made before it is too late.

Bompard, J.M. (1993). THE GENUS MANGIFERA RE-DISCOVERED: THE POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION OF WILD SPECIES TO MANGO CULTIVATION. Acta Hortic. 341, 69-77
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.341.5
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.341.5

Acta Horticulturae