HEURISTIC PHARMACOGNOSTICS IN KING SOLOMON'S GARDEN

Philip S. Lansky
A number of important medicinal plants are well known in ancient Hebrew writings and many of these continue to be well established in the soil of modern Israel. The pharmacognosy, or "plant knowledge" of these species extends from mystical and religious allusions to contemporary studies of chemical constituents, pharmacological activity in vivo and in vitro, and cross-cultural ethnopharmacology. Quick and easy access to large bases of data is available through several large computerized networks, most notably the NAPRALERT developed by Dr. Norman Farnsworth of the Pharmacognosy Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (2). The thrust of the present literature survey is to illuminate some potentially new uses of some of these ancient plants which might one day prove to be of commercial and human value.
Lansky, Philip S. (1993). HEURISTIC PHARMACOGNOSTICS IN KING SOLOMON'S GARDEN. Acta Hortic. 344, 166-177
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.344.20
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.344.20
344_20
166-177

Acta Horticulturae