APPLICATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY TO CRANBERRY: A MODEL FOR FRUIT CROP IMPROVEMENT

R.A. Serres, B.H. McCown, E.L. Zeldin, E.J. Stang, D.E. McCabe
Two aspects of biotechnology, micropropagation and genetic transformation, are being applied to cranberry with the goals of increasing productivity while reducing the potential environmental impacts of cranberry production in sensitive wetland areas. Stabilized cranberry shoot cultures were established on woody plant medium + 0.1 μM 2ip. Rooted microcuttings were planted in an established marsh. Field tests of micropropagated cranberry have been highly successful with greater than 90% field survival and rapid growth allowing for quicker ground coverage compared to conventional cuttings. Adventitious buds were induced on in vitro-derived cranberry stem sections. Electric discharge particle acceleration was used for transformation of cells in these stem sections by bombarding them with plasmid DNA containing NPTII, an antibiotic resistance gene, GUS, a reporter gene, and BT, an insect resistance gene. Bombarded stem sections were transferred to bud induction medium containing kanamycin for selection of transformed cells and overlaid with a liquid kanamycin solution. Transformed plants were recovered from the selection system. The techniques applied with cranberry may serve as a model system for the genetic engineering of other perennial fruit crops.
Serres, R.A., McCown, B.H., Zeldin, E.L., Stang, E.J. and McCabe, D.E. (1993). APPLICATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY TO CRANBERRY: A MODEL FOR FRUIT CROP IMPROVEMENT. Acta Hortic. 345, 149-156
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.345.20
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.345.20
345_20
149-156

Acta Horticulturae