A TWO-YEAR FIELD COMPARISON OF STRAWBERRY FRESH-DUG AND PLUG-TRANSPLANTS ON PLASTIC MULCH

E. Barclay Poling
Annual hill plastic mulch (AHPM) culture is becoming the leading strawberry production system throughout Southeastern United States. ‘Chandler’ is the dominant AHPM cultivar in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. Chandler fresh dug plants and "tips" (for container-cell rooting of plug plants) are propagated in Northern U.S. and Canada for field transplanting in late September through mid-October in the mid-Southern states. The establishment procedure for highly perishable fresh dug transplants depends on intense overhead sprinkling for 1–2 weeks. Sprinkling fresh dug transplants increases the likelihood of anthracnose (Colletorichum acutatum) and bacterial disease infection.

Preliminary commercial grower experiences in North Carolina with plug plants indicate that these do not require intensive overhead sprinkling for post-planting care. In addition, several new double-row plug mulch planters have been successfully used to mechanically transplant and water strawberry plugs. In this investigation, the field productivity of Chandler plugs was found to be comparable to conventional fresh dug plants in both the 1991 and 1992 fruiting seasons at the Central Crops Research Station, Clayton, NC (lat. 35 40'N, long. 78 30'W). However, there were significant seasonal differences in average fruit size and branch crown developement for plug transplants and fresh dug plants.

Barclay Poling, E. (1993). A TWO-YEAR FIELD COMPARISON OF STRAWBERRY FRESH-DUG AND PLUG-TRANSPLANTS ON PLASTIC MULCH. Acta Hortic. 348, 278-278
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.348.53
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.348.53

Acta Horticulturae