GENETIC MAPPING OF THE DIPLOID STRAWBERRY USING RANDOM AMPLIFIED POLYMORPHIC DNA (RAPD) MARKERS

Thomas M. Davis
Genetics maps linking molecular/biochemical markers to genes of economic interest have proven to be valuable research and breeding tools in many crops species. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), a new category of molecular markers called RAPD's (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA's) can be identified in large numbers and used to saturate a molecular linkage map. We are exploiting RAPD's, as well as isozymes and RFLP's (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms), for the purpose of constructing a genetic map, and identifying useful gene tag in the strawberry.

In order to circumvent the genetic complications inherent in the octoploid genomic structure of the commercial strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa, we have begun to construct a strawberry genetic map at the diploid level, using crosses within Fragaria vesca. Having previously identified a close linkage between the isozyme SKDII (shikimate dehydrogenase) and a locus governing red versus yellow fruit color in a cross between diploid cultivars ‘Yellow Wonder’ and ‘Baron Solemacher’, we are not focussing on a wider cross between ‘Yellow Wonder’ and a highly heterozygous wild accession. Segregation of isozymes and RAPD markers in the F1 generation of this cross has resulted in identification of four linkage groups, the largest of which contains ten markers. Preliminary mapping data from the F2 generation of this cross, which is segregating for a variety of morphological/physiological traits, will be reported.

Davis, Thomas M. (1993). GENETIC MAPPING OF THE DIPLOID STRAWBERRY USING RANDOM AMPLIFIED POLYMORPHIC DNA (RAPD) MARKERS. Acta Hortic. 348, 439-439
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.348.87
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.348.87

Acta Horticulturae