STUDIES AND OBSERVATIONS ON THE EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF ANTHRACNOSE FRUIT ROT OF STRAWBERRY IN OHIO

M. A. Ellis, L. V. Madden
Strawberry anthracnose can be caused by at least three species of fungi, Colletotrichum fragariae, C. acutatum, and C. gloeosporioides. All three of these fungi can cause similar or nearly identical symptoms on the plant and fruit. The two most destructive forms of the disease are crown rot, usually associated with C. fragariae, and fruit rot, usually associated with C. acutatum. Both the crown rot and fruit rot forms of the disease have been a major problem in the southern production regions of the U.S. for several years (Maas, 1984). Because anthracnose has generally been restricted to the south, it is usually considered to be a "warm weather" or "southern disease" of strawberry. In the northern U.S., growers and researchers have historically not been faced with this disease problem, and many probably still consider anthracnose to be a problem of the south.

Epidemics of anthracnose fruit rot caused by C. acutatum have occurred in Ohio, but the crown rot phase has been observed only a few times in the mid 1980's. Over the past few years, the incidence of anthracnose fruit rot in northern production areas has increased, and there is concern about the potential impact of this disease in northern, perennial, production systems. The purpose of this paper is to review our research and observations on anthracnose in the northern U.S., and to point out some areas where research is needed in order to develop a better understanding of the disease.

Ellis, M. A. and Madden, L. V. (1993). STUDIES AND OBSERVATIONS ON THE EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF ANTHRACNOSE FRUIT ROT OF STRAWBERRY IN OHIO. Acta Hortic. 348, 449-457
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.348.93
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.348.93

Acta Horticulturae