PRODUCTION "IN VITRO" OF TWO HAZELNUT VARIETIES AND RESULTS ABOUT INOCULUM OF TUBER MAGNATUM PICO ON A MASS SCALE

G. Zuccherelli, S. Zuccherelli, V. Capaccio
The natural mycorrhizal symbiosis is important because provides the arboreus plants involved in it with more nourishment and better growth; symbiosis between forestal plants and edible fungi is particularly interesting.

Since uncontrolled fungi harvesting creates many problems to natural equilibria, new scientific methods have been recently set up to produce hazelnut plants mycorrhized with white truffle, in sterility conditions.

Two hazelnut varieties ("Tonda Romana" and "Tonda Gentile delle Langhe") have been successfully mycorrhized with a spore-inoculum of Tuber magnatum Pico, using a method of root contact between a mycorrhized plant, the so called mother plant (oak or lime) and non mycorrhized plant (young hazelnut plant) in order to transfer the inoculum. By checking hazelnut plantlets after 60 days of root contact with a mycorrhized mother plant we could see that about the 65% of root apices had caught the inoculum while the remaining part was still rapidly growing.

The inoculum by transferring guarantees fungus infection and identity. Moreover, it results that hazelnut plantlets produced "in vitro" estabilish a root symbiosis with Tuber magnatum Pico very easily. The interest for hazelnut is, therefore, not only as forestal plant for the restoration of natural equilibria; it should be considered, in fact, also the possibility to obtain a double production: hazelnuts and truffles.

Zuccherelli, G., Zuccherelli, S. and Capaccio, V. (1994). PRODUCTION "IN VITRO" OF TWO HAZELNUT VARIETIES AND RESULTS ABOUT INOCULUM OF TUBER MAGNATUM PICO ON A MASS SCALE. Acta Hortic. 351, 371-380
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1994.351.41
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1994.351.41

Acta Horticulturae