INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT IN HAZELNUT ORCHARDS OF NORTH AMERICA

M.T. AliNiazee
Insect pests are a major concern of many hazelnut growers in North America. Costs of prophylactic treatments and psychological hardship of pest losses are tremendous burdens that the growers have to bear constantly. The actual crop losses caused by insect pests could also be substantial in some years. The overall pest control costs, therefore, constitutes a major part of general crop production costs. Depending upon weather conditions and severity of pest problems, these costs may range from 19–39%, and if left completely unprotected, as much as 40% of the crop may be destroyed by one single insect pest, the filbertworm, Cydia latiferreanus (AliNiazee 1983a). Although it is not common, the combined pest losses to hazelnut crop in North America could reach nearly 2/3 of the potential crop yield and some pests like the eastern filbert blight could completely destroy trees. On the other hand, controlling pests is not quite as simple as it was once presumed. Many of the side effects of over-simplified approaches to pest control are now visible in many crop systems. Pesticide resistance, secondary pest outbreaks, primary pest resurgence and massive contamination of food and environment have been mentioned frequently in the literature. One frightening prospect is the possibility of loosing one of our most potent methods on insect control, the chemicals. This may happen due to stringent restriction on development, registration and use of insecticides, lack of profitability on part of the insecticide
AliNiazee, M.T. (1994). INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT IN HAZELNUT ORCHARDS OF NORTH AMERICA. Acta Hortic. 351, 543-550
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1994.351.59
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1994.351.59

Acta Horticulturae