ANTIFUNGAL PROTEINS AND THEIR APPLICATION IN THE MOLECULAR BREEDING OF DISEASE-RESISTANT PLANTS

Willem F. Broekaert
The use of chemical fungicides has nowadays become common practice in many agricultural and horticultural crops, including cereals, potato, oilseed rape, apple and grapevines. Agriculture is being pressured by environmentalists and consumer organisations to rationalise the use of fungicides and other pesticides. A number of valid alternatives to chemical protection of plants against fungal diseases do exist or are currently under development. Micro-organisms that antagonise fungal pathogens can be used to control root diseases that are otherwise difficult to treat by conventional means. Classical breeding has been an answer to many devastating diseases for more than hundred years. However, it is clear that these methods have limitations of their own. The newest, though still experimental, addition to disease control methods comes from genetic engineering or molecular breeding.
Broekaert, Willem F. (1994). ANTIFUNGAL PROTEINS AND THEIR APPLICATION IN THE MOLECULAR BREEDING OF DISEASE-RESISTANT PLANTS. Acta Hortic. 355, 209-212
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1994.355.22
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1994.355.22

Acta Horticulturae