ALLIUM GENETIC RESOURCES IN LATIN AMERICA: SITUATION AND PERSPECTIVES

J. Jaramillo V
There are no native Allium species in Latin America. They were first introduced at the end of the 14th century. The most important Allium species in the region are A. cepa and A. sativum, and A. ampeloprasum to some extent. Allium fistulosum is very important in Colombia, where collections started at the end of the 1970s. There are important collections of A. cepa and A. sativum totaling 100 accessions, mainly maintained vegetatively in the region.

The results of a questionnaire sent to different countries of Latin America indicate that constraints for Allium germplasm activities mainly relate to finances, infrastructure, and trained personnel. Lack of policies on resources and institutional support are also cited. Most countries agreed in principle to join a germplasm network, either on a regional or global basis. A regional network on Allium germplasm exchange exists among several Andean countries, coordinated by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

Jaramillo V, J. (1994). ALLIUM GENETIC RESOURCES IN LATIN AMERICA: SITUATION AND PERSPECTIVES. Acta Hortic. 358, 147-152
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1994.358.22
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1994.358.22

Acta Horticulturae