DETECTION OF CARNATION VIRUSES WITH THE TEST PLANT SAPONARIA VACCARIA 'PINK BEAUTY'

F.A. Hakkaart
In those countries where virus control in carnations by means of testing of mother plants has been practiced for several years, the testing scheme is mainly concerned with carnation mottle virus (CaMV) and to a lesser extent with carnation etched ring virus (CaERV). In Denmark and The Netherlands, CaMV is detected mainly with the test plant Chenopodium amaranticolor whereas in England the test plant C. quinoa is used. In other countries, France and Canada, the virus is mainly detected by serological tests. The CaERV in England is detected mainly by graft inoculations to carnation plants of the cultivar 'Joker' that is susceptible to both the 25 nm and 29 nm isometric virus particles. In The Netherlands, tests with 'Joker' did not give consistent reactions to CaERV. Therefore, a great many plant species were grown from seed and tested for their value as indicator plants for CaERV. It was found that Saponaria vaccaria 'Pink Beauty' is an indicator plant for this virus (Hakkaart, 1970a). S. vaccaria was reported as a systemic host of CaMV and as a local lesion host of carnation ringspot virus (CaRSV) by Kemp (1964); but no details on symptoms, incubation period or sensitivity were reported. This paper reports the properties of S. vaccaria 'Pink Beauty' as an indicator plant for CaERV and several other carnation viruses.
Hakkaart, F.A. (1974). DETECTION OF CARNATION VIRUSES WITH THE TEST PLANT SAPONARIA VACCARIA 'PINK BEAUTY'. Acta Hortic. 36, 35-46
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1974.36.2
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1974.36.2

Acta Horticulturae