DETECTION OF A NEW INFECTIOUS DISEASE OF ROSES IN CALIFORNIA

D.J. Gumpf, L.G. Weathers
Symptoms of what is apparently a new disease of roses were first noted in 1968 on one plant of Rosa multiflora, originally obtained as a cutting of a commercial rootstock clone used in Oregon, in February of 1965 (Wagnon, 1970). In 1969 fifty-one hybrid tea tree roses in a commercial planting near Livermore, California, were affected (Wagnon, 1970). In 1969 and 1970, 210 declining roses showing symptoms were removed from a public rose garden in Los Angeles County (Cheo, 1970; Traylor, 1971). Surveys conducted by personnel from the California Department of Agriculture indicated the statewide occurrence of this disease (Jack A. Traylor, personal communication). In most cases diseased roses were removed and destroyed in an effort to prevent further spread.

The following paper details the symptoms of this disease as well as some of the first attempts at transmission and identification of the causal agent.

Gumpf, D.J. and Weathers, L.G. (1974). DETECTION OF A NEW INFECTIOUS DISEASE OF ROSES IN CALIFORNIA. Acta Hortic. 36, 53-58
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1974.36.4
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1974.36.4

Acta Horticulturae