GROWTH AND YIELD OF HIGH DENSITY PEACH TREES AS INFLUENCED BY SPACING AND ROOTING VOLUME

M. Rieger, S.C. Myers
In high density plantings, it is unclear whether competition for light or root competition limits tree growth to a greater extent. The relative effects of these variables on 'Garnet Beauty' peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] growth and yield was tested using a factorial combination of 3 in-row spacings (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 m) and 3 rooting volumes (10-cm wide trenches 0.3, 0.6, or 0.9 m deep). The rooting volume was maintained by a fabric lining in trenches which allowed only small roots to escape to surrounding soil. Four seasons of growth data and the fourth year's yield data are reported. Trunk cross-sectional area (TCA) increased with aerial spacing every year, but TCA increased with rooting volume in only the 2.0 m spacing during the first year. Shoot length increased with increasing spacing in 3 out of 4 years, but was affected by rooting volume in only 4 out of 18 possible cases, when shoot length generally decreased as rooting volume increased. In the fourth year, yield (kg/tree) and yield efficiency (kg/cm2 TCA) increased with aerial spacing but decreased as rooting volume increased at the 1.5 and 2.0 m spacings. Overall, competition for light among trees (spacing) had a stronger effect on tree growth through the first four years than did root competition.
Rieger, M. and Myers, S.C. (1997). GROWTH AND YIELD OF HIGH DENSITY PEACH TREES AS INFLUENCED BY SPACING AND ROOTING VOLUME. Acta Hortic. 451, 611-616
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1997.451.71
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1997.451.71
Prunus persica, yield efficiency, root restriction, training

Acta Horticulturae