THE INFLUENCE OF CLIMATE ON SENSORY QUALITY AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF CARROTS FOR FRESH CONSUME AND INDUSTRIAL USE

H.J. Rosenfeld
The effect of temperature on growth and yield of carrots has been studied by Bremer (1931) and Barnes (1936). The root length and glucose content decreased as temperature increased, while sucrose decreased at low or medium temperature, but increased at medium to high temperature. The dry matter content was not affected by temperature. The carotene content stayed unchanged at temperatures between 10 and 21°C, but decreased as the temperature rose from 21 to 27°C. Most authors agree that the best colour and the highest content of carotenoids are obtained in carrots grown at temperatures above 16°C (Banga et al. 1955, Bradley and Dyck 1968).

However, only little attention has been paid to the role of temperature on sensory parameters. Simon et al. (1982) simulated the climate of three locations in the USA (California, Florida and Wisconsin), in order to consider the sensory and objective flavour components of several carrot inbred lines. Carrots grown in California winter climate showed higher sugar content and were sweeter than carrots grown in Florida and Wisconsin summer climate. Martens et al. (1985) found no relations between sweetness of carrots and temperature during the summer months, but bitter taste of carrots was related to low growing temperature and rain fall. Baardseth et al. (1996) found significant influence of environmental conditions on colour, taste and texture parameters, but with no particular reference to growing temperature.

As shown in the previous experiments a number of uncontrolled factors, like light, soil, fertiliser practices and water management may have influenced sensory quality and chemical composition of carrots. However, with the exception of one experiment (Banga 1955), no results of experiments performed in controlled environment were published. Most experiments were performed under field conditions with large variations from one year to another, and only a few parameters were compared in univariate models.

The purpose of the present study has been:

  1. To study the basic influence of temperature and light on sensory attributes, chemical composition and morphological parameters of carrots by means of multivariate techniques.
  2. To test the applicability of the results found in controlled environment on field grown carrots in locations with natural high and low temperatures and light intensities.
Rosenfeld, H.J. (1998). THE INFLUENCE OF CLIMATE ON SENSORY QUALITY AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF CARROTS FOR FRESH CONSUME AND INDUSTRIAL USE. Acta Hortic. 476, 69-76
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1998.476.7
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1998.476.7
carrot, sensory, chemical, quality, PCA, PLS

Acta Horticulturae