HEAT TREATMENT PREVENTS CHILLING INJURY OF TOMATO (Lycopersicon escultentum) FRUITS: HEAT SHOCK GENES AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS IN THE RESISTANCE OF TOMATO FRUIT TO LOW TEMPERATURES

K.E. Vlachonasios, D.K. Kadyrzhanova, D.R. Dilley
Chilling injury (CI) was prevented by heat treating mature green tomato fruit at 42°C for 36 or 48 h prior to storage at 2°C for 2 weeks, whereas fruit stored at 2°C without preheating developed typical CI symptoms. Protection was lost when the tomatoes were transferred from 42°C to 20°C for 1 to 3 days before low temperature storage. Three members of cytosolic class I smHSP, a cytosolic class II smHSP, a chloroplastic smHSP, and a cytosolic HSP90 were cloned. Transcripts for cytosolic class I and II smHSPs, the chloroplastic smHSP as well as the HSP90 were up-regulated by heat treatment and re-induced during cold storage; fruits receiving only chilling temperatures had low level expression. The re-induction of the transcripts in the cold was more favorable after continued exposure to high temperatures. In addition to mRNA expression pattern of the smHSPs and HSP90s, the protein level follows similar pattern. The cold-inducible expression of heat shock genes in the heat-treated fruits raises the possibility that both high and low molecular weight HSPs may play critical roles in resistance to chilling stress, or may work in concert with other factors related to chilling tolerance.
Vlachonasios, K.E., Kadyrzhanova, D.K. and Dilley, D.R. (2001). HEAT TREATMENT PREVENTS CHILLING INJURY OF TOMATO (Lycopersicon escultentum) FRUITS: HEAT SHOCK GENES AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS IN THE RESISTANCE OF TOMATO FRUIT TO LOW TEMPERATURES. Acta Hortic. 553, 543-548
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2001.553.126
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2001.553.126
fruit ripening, molecular chaperones, gene-specific differential display
English
553_126
543-548

Acta Horticulturae