MODIFIED-ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING OF FRESH PRODUCE: WHERE THE MODEL MEETS THE REAL WORLD

A.C. Cameron
Modeling has proven to be a useful tool for studying the processes of gas exchange and plant response in modified-atmosphere (MA) package systems. As early as 1940, early trials to achieve beneficial modified atmospheres were conducted, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that the first models were published to describe gas exchange characteristics in MA packages. Since that time, techniques for generating empirical information have improved and increasingly complex models have been created to describe respiration and subsequent package atmospheres. The interactions of temperature, different starting products, and time from packaging have been described and modeled in some detail. In recent years, various aspects of quality have been modeled, though quality has a tendency to be qualitative in nature. Though models have improved dramatically in the last decade, there are still few commercial applications in existence. The uncontrolled nature of starting plant material, handling processes and storage temperatures coupled with simplified assumptions hamper application of models to new products.
Cameron, A.C. (2001). MODIFIED-ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING OF FRESH PRODUCE: WHERE THE MODEL MEETS THE REAL WORLD. Acta Hortic. 566, 221-229
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2001.566.27
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2001.566.27
Mathematical modeling; gas exchange; ethanol detection
English

Acta Horticulturae