FIELD PERFORMANCE OF THE LOWBUSH BLUEBERRY PROPAGATED BY SEED, STEM CUTTINGS AND MICROPROPAGATION

A.R. Jamieson, N.L. Nickerson
Field plantings of improved Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton clones have had limited success due to reduced rhizome formation in plants propagated by stem cuttings. This study was designed to evaluate the field performance of the lowbush blueberry when propagated by alternative methods. A field plot was established in 1985 from plants that were either propagated by stem cuttings, by micropropagation, or grown from open-pollinated seeds. The three blueberry genotypes selected for this study were known to vary in yield of fruit and proclivity to produce rhizomes. When propagated by cuttings, K206 produced many rhizomes but few fruit, K74-13 produced many fruit but few rhizomes, and ME3 produced many fruit and moderate numbers of rhizomes. After 16 years, the greatest row widths were in the plots grown from seedlings. These were 2 to 3-fold wider than plots grown from cuttings. Rows from micropropagated plants were nearly as wide as the seedlings. The enhanced rhizome production of the micropropagated and seedling plants did not always lead to a greater fruit production.
Jamieson, A.R. and Nickerson, N.L. (2003). FIELD PERFORMANCE OF THE LOWBUSH BLUEBERRY PROPAGATED BY SEED, STEM CUTTINGS AND MICROPROPAGATION. Acta Hortic. 626, 423-428
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2003.626.58
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2003.626.58
Vaccinium angustifolium, propagation, micropropagation, fruit production, rhizome, growth, development
English

Acta Horticulturae