OSMOTIC ADJUSTMENT OF TOMATO FRUITS AND LEAVES GROWN IN SAND AND IRRIGATED WITH SALINE WATER

Z. Plaut, A. Grava, C. Yehezkel, E. Matan
Growth rate of tomato fruits was decreased throughout the entire season when irrigated with saline water whereas water stress decreased this rate much less. Accumulation rates of glucose and ions were, however, increased by both salinity and water stress. The concentration of fruit glucose and total soluble solids (TSS) was higher in water stressed plants than in unstressed plants throughout the entire season. Salinity raised these concentrations even more but the combination of both stresses did not result in a cumulative effect. Osmotic adjustment of fruits was mainly attained by glucose and potassium, whereas that of leaves was attained by potassium, chloride, other ions and a large fraction of undefined solutes. The distribution of solutes between fruits and leaves was much different for the various solutes. Calcium was up to 70 times higher in leaves and Na and Cl were up to 3.5-7.0 times higher. The concentration of K in leaves was only about ½ of that found in fruits and sugars were only 2.5% in leaves as compared to fruits.
Plaut, Z., Grava, A., Yehezkel, C. and Matan, E. (2005). OSMOTIC ADJUSTMENT OF TOMATO FRUITS AND LEAVES GROWN IN SAND AND IRRIGATED WITH SALINE WATER. Acta Hortic. 697, 285-291
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2005.697.35
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2005.697.35
Salinity, Water stress, Assimilates, Ions, Transport
English

Acta Horticulturae