INFLUENCE OF SALINE WATER ON YIELD AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESSES OF RED BEET

E. Rumasz-Rudnicka, C. Podsiadło, I. Zbieć
Due to increasing demand for watering cultivated plants, this study aimed at the possibility of using saline water for supplemental irrigation of vegetables. Field experiments were conducted in 2001-2003. Red beet was grown on sandy soil and irrigated with water of various salt contents. On the average, supplemental irrigation caused yield increase of 43% as compared with the unwatered control. Tap water (salt contents 200 mg.dm-3) increased the yield of beet roots by 62%, diluted saline water (salt content 2700 mg.dm-3) caused a 45% yield increase, and saline water (salt content 5200 mg.dm-3) increased the yield by 23%. Supplemental irrigation significantly increased the leaves’ photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance. The best results (increased physiological activity) were observed in plants which have been irrigated with tap water. The netto productivity of 1 mm water used for irrigation depended on the salt content in water, and was best for tap water. These effects were of a lesser extent when the irrigation water contained more salt.
Rumasz-Rudnicka, E., Podsiadło, C. and Zbieć, I. (2007). INFLUENCE OF SALINE WATER ON YIELD AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESSES OF RED BEET. Acta Hortic. 729, 385-390
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2007.729.64
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2007.729.64
irrigation, vegetables, crop, photosynthesis, transpiration, CO2 concentration, temperature of leaves
English

Acta Horticulturae