ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PRODUCTION AND COLLECTION OF CHAMOMILE FLOWERS

I. Salamon, A. Plačková
The major environment issues globally are long-term pollution of air, soil and water by xenobiotics. They include inorganic (heavy metals) and organic components (pesticide residues) that are not of natural origin or quantity in the ecosystem and can have effects ranging from unhealthy to toxic. The greatest civil catastrophe in the history of nuclear energy was in Chernobyl, Ukraine, on April 25, 1986. The radioactivity released from this disaster continues to influence vegetation in the Slovak Republic even though the Chernobyl crash occurred many years ago. The quality and effectiveness of medicinal plants are dependent upon environmental conditions that occur during periods of cultivation and harvest. Environmental risks (content of heavy metals, pesticide residues and radioactivity) associated with the production and harvest of chamomile flowers were analyzed. Trace concentrations of xenobiotics and levels of radioactivity were measured. The results were compared with recommended levels established by legislation of the Slovak Republic. With regard to Regulation No. 14/1996 & No. 12/2001 of the Ministry of Healthy Service in the Slovak Republic, heavy metals, pesticide residues and radioactivity of medicinal plant samples were less than the maximum permissible concentration. The chamomile raw material is therefore acceptable on the world market and can be used for pharmaceutical processing of medicinal plants globally.
Salamon, I. and Plačková, A. (2007). ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PRODUCTION AND COLLECTION OF CHAMOMILE FLOWERS. Acta Hortic. 749, 211-216
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2007.749.25
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2007.749.25
heavy metals, Matricaria recutita, radioactivity, residues of pesticides
English

Acta Horticulturae