WHY DOES ARTOCARPUS ALTILIS REMAIN A BACKYARD TREE IN THE REPUBLIC OF BENIN?

G. Gbèhounou
In southern Benin, breadfruit is a delight for consumers for its nice taste and texture. Local names indicate that breadfruit is an introduced plant, probably during the colonial period. The local name “Blèfoutou” is a deformation of “breadfruit,” while “Yovotévi” literally means “the European yam,” suggesting it is as good as yam. A survey showed that breadfruit is highly appreciated for its nutritional value and represents a viable alternative to yam. The breadfruit tree still has the status of a volunteer plant, growing in humid zones along streams, almost exclusively in the southeast. Cultivation and use of breadfruit has not received political support. Historically the oil palm, a major plantation crop in Benin, was actively promoted during the 19th century by King Guézo, who required each family to plant a palm every time a child was born. During the colonial period, a research station was created and oil palm was grown in large areas and promoted as an industrial crop. Cassava, a major food crop in Benin today, also benefited from political support. Government support and research are needed to promote the cultivation and use of breadfruit—a species with a great potential!
Gbèhounou, G. (2007). WHY DOES ARTOCARPUS ALTILIS REMAIN A BACKYARD TREE IN THE REPUBLIC OF BENIN?. Acta Hortic. 757, 115-120
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2007.757.14
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2007.757.14
breadfruit, yam, political support
English

Acta Horticulturae