DIRECT AND INDIRECT INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POWDERY MILDEW AND SPIDER MITE POPULATIONS IN GREENHOUSE ROSE CROPS

C. Poncet, A. Bout, M.-M. Muller, L. Mailleret
Designing new crop protection strategies as alternatives to conventional chemical control requires a better understanding of biotic and abiotic factors involved in pest dynamics. Integrated pest management (IPM) programs generally begin in multiple tactic approaches to managing each key pest in an individual way and failures are frequently observed. The success of a biological control depends on the interaction between the biological agent and the targeted pest as well as on a network of biotic interactions with other biological organisms (other arthropods, fungi, plants, etc.). Even in a relatively simple “ecosystem” such as a greenhouse rose crop, complex biological interactions may take place and significantly influence crop health. This study aimed at pointing out multiple interactions between a major pest (two-spotted spider mite), its classical biocontrol agent (Neoseiulus californicus) and one main rose crop disease (powdery mildew). Lab experiments showed unexpected interactions. This suggests that an ecosystem approach is needed to advance IPM.
Poncet, C., Bout, A., Muller, M.-M. and Mailleret, L. (2008). DIRECT AND INDIRECT INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POWDERY MILDEW AND SPIDER MITE POPULATIONS IN GREENHOUSE ROSE CROPS. Acta Hortic. 797, 229-234
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2008.797.31
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2008.797.31
Integrated Pest Management, greenhouse, biotic interactions, Sphaerotheca pannosa, Tetranychus urticae, Neoseiulus californicus
English

Acta Horticulturae