COLUMN CULTURE OF TOMATO - THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS

P.J.A.L. De Lint
In greenhouses, tomatoes can be grown in a variety of ways. Normally, plants are trained to one stem and supported to grow upright. These single stem plants can be planted in the greenhouse soil, or in troughs or buckets filled with artificial mixes or with pure peat. Some 2,8 to 3,2 plants are planted per m2 and plants are permitted to develop some 12 or more trusses per stem. It is of course possible to stop the plants after the 4(th), 3rd or 1st truss. Early stopping allows denser planting: bed-culture with 3-truss plants allowing 9 plants/m2 (3), tiered troughs with single-truss plants even 27 plants/m2 (1). Once we have these short-stemmed plants, it is of course possible to move them around as in the rotating wheel troughs (4) and also in tower houses (5). Also self-stopping varieties seem useful when working with short-stemmed cultural systems.

All of the above methods have one characteristic in common: all plants of one crop are planted at the same time, they are all of the same age. In column culture short-stemmed plants are grown in six layers on top of each other, the top-layer plants being young seedlings, the bottom-layer plants with ripe fruits.

This article is an attempt to point to advantages of column cultures as compared with other systems.

De Lint, P.J.A.L. (1968). COLUMN CULTURE OF TOMATO - THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS. Acta Hortic. 7, 100-103
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1968.7.11
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1968.7.11
7_11
100-103

Acta Horticulturae