GENETIC DIVERSITY OF CANADIAN ISOLATES OF PLUM POX VIRUS AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE

D. James, A. Varga
Since the initial detection of Plum pox virus (PPV) in Canada in 2000, and as a result of subsequent intensive surveys, isolates of three strains of PPV were detected; PPV-D, PPV-W, and PPV-Rec. Only isolates of PPV-D were found in trees in commercial orchards; while isolates of PPV-D, PPV-W, and PPV-Rec were found in trees on homeowner/residential properties. Phylogenetic analysis of D isolates from commercial orchards revealed two main clusters or subgroups (I and II, Theilmann et al., 2006). Some D isolates from homeowner properties cluster with subgroup I or II, but most appear to be distinct from either subgroup. PPV-W and PPV-Rec were each found in plum trees on individual homeowner properties. The complete genomes of 2 Canadian isolates of PPV Rec were sequenced and were 99% identical. In phylogenetic analysis based on the N-terminus of the CP, they were most similar to the Rec isolates J4c (Poland) and MYV-3 (Slovakia). The Canadian Rec isolates are the first isolates of PPV Rec found outside of Europe and sequence analysis reveals a close relationship to European Rec isolates. Isolates from homeowner properties form the major source of genetic diversity of PPV found in Canada.
James, D. and Varga, A. (2011). GENETIC DIVERSITY OF CANADIAN ISOLATES OF PLUM POX VIRUS AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE. Acta Hortic. 899, 29-38
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2011.899.2
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2011.899.2
genetic diversity, Plum pox virus, strains Dideron (D), Winona (W), Recombinant (Rec)
English

Acta Horticulturae