THE EFFECTS OF IRRIGATION, FERTILIZATION AND ORGANIC MATTER ON ROSES GROWN IN FOUR SOILS IN THE GREENHOUSE

S. Dasberg, A. Feigin
Roses of the Baccara variety were grown during 4 years in 4 soils of different properties, but in the same greenhouses and location: a sandy soil of the coastal region (8% clay), a loessial sandy loam (16% clay), a grumusolic clay loam (39% clay), and a heavy clay grumusol (69% clay).

During the first 2 years the 2 lighter soils gave higher yields with better quality than the clay soils. During the last 2 years the loessial soil gave the highest yields. The addition of 70 1/m2 of peat affected the organic matter content and the water retention properties of the light soils, but not the flower yields.

Irrigation twice weekly during the summer had a small advantage part of the time on some of the soils, as compared with irrigation once a week. When during the last year of the experiment the latter plots were irrigated very frequently (every 2–3 days), they gave better yields than the twice-weekly irrigated treatment.

The yield and quality differences were analysed in relation to soil physical properties and fertility status.

Dasberg, S. and Feigin, A. (1979). THE EFFECTS OF IRRIGATION, FERTILIZATION AND ORGANIC MATTER ON ROSES GROWN IN FOUR SOILS IN THE GREENHOUSE. Acta Hortic. 89, 111-120
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1979.89.18
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1979.89.18

Acta Horticulturae