PROMOTION OF INDIGENOUS VEGETABLES IN ASIA: CONSERVATION AND USE OF SELECTED CROPS IN INDONESIA, THE PHILIPPINES, AND TAIWAN

A.W. Ebert
Diversifying crop production and diets combats malnutrition among the poor in developing countries, generates income, and sustains ecosystems under threat due to human intervention. Crop and diet diversification could be achieved by making better use of resilient indigenous vegetables that easily adapt to degraded, drought-prone, flooded, or saline land - areas which are increasing due to climate change. Despite the recognized importance of indigenous vegetables in alleviating malnutrition and poverty, many remain underutilized due to a lack of information on their use, health benefits, field performance, and input requirements. A lack of cultivars or lines for widespread distribution and uncertainty on how these plants can fit into common production systems further curtail their use. AVRDC - The World Vegetable Center currently conducts project activities in collaboration with national partners in Indonesia, the Philippines, and Taiwan to promote the conservation and use of indig¬enous vegetables. Project activities focus on the rescue, improved conservation, and seed increase of promising lines, cultivar trials and participatory evaluation of selected accessions, and training personnel in germplasm management. Priority crops differ from country to country. Ipomoea aquatic (kangkong, water spinach) and Moringa oleifera (Moringa) are described.
Ebert, A.W. (2011). PROMOTION OF INDIGENOUS VEGETABLES IN ASIA: CONSERVATION AND USE OF SELECTED CROPS IN INDONESIA, THE PHILIPPINES, AND TAIWAN. Acta Hortic. 918, 397-403
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2011.918.51
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2011.918.51
indigenous vegetables, malnutrition, crop and diet diversification, agricultural biodiversity, climate change, Moringa, kangkong
English

Acta Horticulturae