LIFESTYLE HORTICULTURE IN AUSTRALIA: COMMODITIES, ENTERPRISE NUMBERS, EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

D.E. Aldous, S. Holborn
Since the late 1970s, Australian horticulture has been categorized into three sectors; food, service and amenity. More recently amenity horticulture has undergone a number of name changes from environmental and urban, to that of lifestyle horticulture, which has been described as “those public and commercial businesses involved in the horticultural production, management and servicing of urban green spaces for environmental, social, economic and health benefit”. Currently, the value of lifestyle horticulture products and services has been based on one of economic growth, employment prospects, tourism opportunities and/or their role in value-adding environmental, social, physical health and mental well-being. However, lifestyle horticulture has always been a dynamic sector of horticulture, with a strong focus on environmental, social, cultural and economic development along the supply/value chain. The objective of this paper is to characterise the enterprise numbers, com¬modities, employment and value of lifestyle horticulture generally and to demonstrate the value of the lifestyle horticulture commodity sod. Results show that over the next 3 years, 55% of growers will increase production, but the sector continues to be challenged by water restrictions, rising labour, fuel, insurance and equipment costs, as well as production and marketing related problems, which could impact on income, employment opportunities and market share. In the longer term, there is a need for capacity building among growers to deal with horticultural production, technological applications, business management and marketing challenges, as well as gain information on key industry benchmarks, particularly those supply chains operating under a drier environment and with limited irrigation.
Aldous, D.E. and Holborn, S. (2012). LIFESTYLE HORTICULTURE IN AUSTRALIA: COMMODITIES, ENTERPRISE NUMBERS, EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. Acta Hortic. 930, 35-41
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.930.3
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.930.3
urban horticulture, market chain, supply/value chain, turf management
English

Acta Horticulturae