IN VITRO MICROPROPAGATION OF DOG ROSE (ROSA CANINA L.)

M. Shirdel, A. Motallebi-Azar, N. Mahna
Dog rose is a medicinal plant known to be effective in the treatment of human gout disease through diminishing blood uric acid levels. In order to achieve in vitro micropropagation of this plant, young axillary buds from healthy and well growing dog rose plants were cut up, surface sterilized and initiated on medium containing MS salts and BAP (1 mg L-1). The shoots from these buds were transferred to the multiplication media containing MS salts, GA3 (1 mg L-1), BAP (1 and 2 mg L-1), and adenine sulphate (AdS) (1 and 2 L-1). Shoot length, the number of leaves, and the number of necrotic and chlorotic leaves were measured after 30 days. Analysis of variance demonstrated that the evaluated traits were not significantly influenced by different concentrations of BAP and AdS when used separately and together (P<0.05). The longest shoots and the highest leaf number were observed when BAP and AdS were used together with the concentrations of 2 and 1 mg L-1, respectively. Moreover, in this treatments, the number of necrotic and chlorotic leaves was found to be maximum.
Shirdel, M., Motallebi-Azar, A. and Mahna, N. (2012). IN VITRO MICROPROPAGATION OF DOG ROSE (ROSA CANINA L.). Acta Hortic. 937, 911-913
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.937.112
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.937.112
medicinal plant, growth regulator
English

Acta Horticulturae