INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT-BASED NURSERY CROP PRODUCTION EXTENSION PROGRAMMING

A. Fulcher
Abstract Nursery crop growers in the US are faced with several challenges including: 1) high quality expectations from customers, 2) expensive pesticides, 3) increasing regulation, 4) risk of phytotoxicity from pesticide applications during hot weather, and 5) restricted worker access to fields due to pesticide re-entry intervals. In Kentucky, USA, a comprehensive Integrated Pest Management (IPM)-based approach to pest management was initiated by the University of Kentucky Department of Horticulture to assist growers in meeting these challenges. The approach includes bilingual (English and Spanish) educational programs for growers and nursery workers on numerous topics (preventing pests; resistant cultivars; production practices to maintain plant health; pest identification; lifecycle and biology; and pest control techniques), the development of nursery scouting protocols, the initiation of a nursery scouting program, and an electronic newsletter with timely pest alerts based on weekly scouting sessions. A final component to the program began recently, as collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture and the Ohio State University and includes a modified pesticide application technique for air-assisted sprayers. This modified technique was established at select nurseries in Central Kentucky. The technique reduces the amount of active ingredient applied per acre by 50% seasonally while maintaining or increasing the level of pest control. Growers report saving money; reducing labor, pesticides, and phytotoxicity; and increasing quality due to imple¬menting the IPM-based approach to nursery crop pest management. Additionally, two emerging exotic pests [granulate ambrosia beetle (Xylosandrus crassiusculus) and Japanese maple scale (Lopholeucaspis japonica)] were documented through the scouting program. From 2004-2009, this comprehensive IPM-based approach to pest management, coordinated through a grant from the USDA had an estimated return on investment of $20.79 for every grant dollar invested as estimated from grower survey responses and program attendance.
Fulcher, A. (2012). INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT-BASED NURSERY CROP PRODUCTION EXTENSION PROGRAMMING. Acta Hortic. 937, 59-61
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.937.5
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.937.5
IPM, pest management, woody plants, half-rate, scouting
English

Acta Horticulturae