PRESENT AND FUTURE TRENDS IN PEACH ROOTSTOCK BREEDING WORLDWIDE

M.J. Rubio-Cabetas
Peach rootstock development has shifted from seedling to clonal types during the last 20 years. Despite the remarkable progress made in this direction, seedling rootstocks still lead rootstock utilization in many growing regions around the world. The development of new rootstocks to solve some of existing soil and disease problems has mainly focused on interspecific hybridizations and has been mostly undertaken by public programmes because of the time, cost and risk associated with their development. However, the private industry is also emerging in the current decade as a significant contributor to the development of some of the newest rootstocks. However, the choice of rootstock is becoming increasingly difficult as a result of the availability of a great number of new rootstocks and the need to adapt to different and new edaphoclimatic conditions. Adaptation to hot, arid climates and to orchard replant sites are important criteria in the development of new rootstocks for peach. Specific objectives for these areas address water scarcity and poor quality, salinity, but also production in regions having both light and heavy soils must be considered.
The introduction of novel genes for resistance to nematodes, soil root fungi, soil bacteria, soil sickness and Peach Tree Short Life (PTSL) has been successfully achieved in the last decade. Particularly noteworthy among recent releases has been the incorporation of Root Knot Nematode (RKN) resistance. Rootstocks have also been developed for replant sites to reduce the incidence of PSTL. Special emphasis has been placed on developing dwarfing rootstocks for high-density orchard systems. However, adaptation to other desirable soil properties, such as tolerance to salinity, alkalinity, waterlogging and drought is more complex. As a consequence, many opportunities and challenges remain to be addressed in the adaptation to abiotic factors required for selecting the ideal rootstock for peach in the future, including graft compatibility, and rootstock influence on scion performance. Some research programmes are now aimed at understanding important biological phenomena in the roots. Biotechnology is beginning to show a great potential in speeding up rootstocks with desirable horticultural traits and new strategies used in other crops have also become relevant in peach root tissues. Along these lines, this contribution examines the possibilities of improving rootstock breeding applying biotechnological techniques and developing markers to assist selection for complex traits.
Rubio-Cabetas, M.J. (2012). PRESENT AND FUTURE TRENDS IN PEACH ROOTSTOCK BREEDING WORLDWIDE. Acta Hortic. 962, 81-90
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.962.10
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.962.10
alkalinity, nematodes, rootstocks, vigour control, Prunus persica, waterlogging
English

Acta Horticulturae