INCIDENCE OF BLIND NODES WITHIN PRUNUS SPECIES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLIMATE

O. Carrillo-Mendoza, J.X. Chaparro
Blind nodes are a common problem in peach cultivars planted in subtropical areas. Little is known about the incidence of blind nodes in interspecific hybrids of peach × almond and peach × P. kansuensis, and the patterns of segregation in subsequent generations. F1, F2 and backcrosses populations were evaluated in regard to blind node frequency in Gainesville, Florida. Almond progeny in F1 and backcross populations tended to have a higher frequency of blind nodes. A wide range of blind node frequency was observed in segregating progeny from the different species. Comparison of blind node frequency in branches and main stems of trees indicated that the main axis had a higher frequency of blind nodes than lateral branches. Blind nodes were often associated with short internodes and terminal buds.
Carrillo-Mendoza, O. and Chaparro, J.X. (2012). INCIDENCE OF BLIND NODES WITHIN PRUNUS SPECIES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLIMATE. Acta Hortic. 962, 209-215
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.962.30
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.962.30
peach, prunus kansuensis, almond, backcross population, breeding
English

Acta Horticulturae