QUANTITATIVE PARAMETERS OF PEACH AND APRICOT FLOWER BUD DEVELOPMENT

SZ. Németh, L. Szalay
The phenological processes of flower bud development of stone fruits during dormancy are not thoroughly known. Fruit set of these species, especially of peach and apricot is determined by the production of dormant flower buds in late summer or fall, the survival rate of buds during winter frosts and by their ability to develop normal floral organs in the next spring. To study flower bud development we measured pistil length, bud weight, and water content. There were significant differences in the process of flower bud development between genotypes within species and also between the different types of shoots on which the buds were located. On short shoots buds developed at a higher speed, than on long shoots. The last floral organ, which appeared in the primordium was the pistil. The process of pistil elongation was divided into four phases. Until the autumn leaf fall the development was rapid, then during endodormancy no elongation was observed. Subsequently, elongation was slow and finally, approximately two weeks before bloom, elongation of the pistil was very rapid. Measuring the bud weight, and water content were also good methods to describe the dormancy status of cultivars. Changes in water content also indicated the environmental adaptability of cultivar because the overwintering organs of peach and apricot were subject to drying during winter. In summary, quantitative parameters of flower bud development supplemented the qualitative parameters in the evaluation of winter hardiness of genotypes.
Németh, SZ. and Szalay, L. (2012). QUANTITATIVE PARAMETERS OF PEACH AND APRICOT FLOWER BUD DEVELOPMENT. Acta Hortic. 962, 253-259
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.962.36
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.962.36
flower bud development, pistil length, bud weight, water content, peach, apricot
English

Acta Horticulturae