THE DIVERSITY OF INDIGENOUS AFRICAN LEAFY VEGETABLES THAT ARE PRODUCED, CONSUMED AND SOLD IN VARIOUS HOUSEHOLDS IN VIHIGA DISTRICT, WESTERN KENYA

S. Aura
Despite the increased recognition of African Leafy Vegetables (ALVs) as an important source of nutrition and income, there is still a paucity of research highlighting the cultivation, consumption and marketing attributed to them. ALVs could inform programming, monitoring and evaluation of related nutrition and development programs. This study aimed at investigating the diversity of ALVs that are cultivated, eaten and sold in various households, through use of selected data from a cross-sectional production, consumption and marketing survey in Vihiga District, western Kenya. The main ALVs under study were amaranths (Amaranthus blitum), cowpea leaves (Vigna unguiculata), slender leaf (Crotalaria ochroleuca), African night shade (Solanum villosum), jute mallow (Corchorus olitorius), pumpkin leaves (Curcubita moschata) and spider plant (Cleome gynandra). The problem currently facing the continent is that knowledge has been passed through the generations with little documentation. The available documentation faces a lack of uniformity due to the use of many dialects that offer descriptions of similar products in different names. Green leafy vegetables have played a role in the diets of people all over the world, but in Africa they have a major significance in the nutritional and medicinal aspects of human welfare. In studies on the relationships between plants and people it has been observed that many species of leafy vegetables that are part of traditional diets have not been fully exploited. The African indigenous plants used as green leafy vegetables are also cultivated for other uses, for example, cowpeas (main food is the seeds), cassava (main food is the root), potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, young gourd, cucumber and germinating coconuts.
Aura, S. (2013). THE DIVERSITY OF INDIGENOUS AFRICAN LEAFY VEGETABLES THAT ARE PRODUCED, CONSUMED AND SOLD IN VARIOUS HOUSEHOLDS IN VIHIGA DISTRICT, WESTERN KENYA. Acta Hortic. 979, 249-254
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.979.25
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.979.25
marketing, cultivation, diversity
English

Acta Horticulturae