SMALL FRUIT PRODUCTION IN HIGH TUNNELS IN THE US

K. Demchak, E.J. Hanson
High tunnel production of small fruit crops in the US varies widely as related to extent and objective of tunnel use. On the west coast, large-scale high tunnels are used primarily to protect berry crops from the elements, thus increasing shelf-life and feasibility of shipping berries to distant markets. In the western US, approximately 2100 ha of berry crops are grown under high tunnels, primarily red raspberries and to a lesser extent blackberries, both mainly for wholesale markets. In the midwestern and eastern US, high tunnel production is diverse, with mostly small-scale single-bay tunnels being used by growers who primarily direct market fruit to consumers. In these areas, a main objective is early and late season extension for raspberries and strawberries. Producers of fall berry crops are facing a new challenge, spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii). Populations of this vinegar fly are highest late in the season, thus being problematic for late summer and fall berry crop production.
Demchak, K. and Hanson, E.J. (2013). SMALL FRUIT PRODUCTION IN HIGH TUNNELS IN THE US. Acta Hortic. 987, 41-44
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.987.4
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.987.4
protected culture, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, Fragaria × ananassa, Rubus
English