HISTORY OF THE PRODUCTION OF TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING IN JAPAN

S. Kamimura
There is no definitive record of when the tomato was first imported into Japan. However, it is believed that the tomato was first brought to Southeast Asia or China by the Portuguese, and was then brought by either the Dutch or the Portuguese to this country (Fukuda, K., 1979; Haruyama, U., 1953; Kanie, K., 1978; Kida, M., 1925). The first "tomato" in Japan was a picture of a tomato in a picture book of fruits, vegetables, and flowerings, painted under the name of "Togaki" (Indian persimmon) by a famous artist, Tanyu Kano (1602–1674) (Haruyama, U., 1953). This book is possessed by the Tokyo National Museum (Takeda, T., 1978). The picture was probably painted in the 1660's (Haruyama, U., 1953; Takeda, T., 1978). The earliest mention of the tomato in literature was in Yamato Honzo (Japanese Herbs) by Ekiken Kaibara in 1709 (Kaibara, E., 1709). Subsequently, a book describing the tomato was issued by Kanen Iwasaki in 1768, and later, another book was issued by Yokusai Iinuma, in 1859. In those days, however, the tomato was cultivated only for ornament in Japan (Fujii, T., 1948; Fukuda, K., 1974). In the late 1900's, the Meiji Government (1868–1912) imported the tomato as a garden vegetable from the United States, France, and England (Takahashi, K., 1915). In those days, it was called often "Akanasu" (red eggplant) or "Tomato" (Fukuba H., 1893; Kaitakushi, 1873). At the present time, the preferred name is "Tomato", which is the English word adopted into the Japanese language. Although it was reported that many people in Tokyo began to eat tomatoes around 1909 (Yamada, S., 1909), it was probably not until the 1920's that the tomato became widely cultivated as an edible vegetable in Japan. In addition, although tomato processing was likewise initiated at the beginning of the 1900's in this country (Fukuda, K., 1974), it may be said that full-scale tomato processing has only developed since about 1960, along with the increasing demand for the tomato products as a result of the changing eating habits in Japan.
Kamimura, S. (1980). HISTORY OF THE PRODUCTION OF TOMATOES FOR PROCESSING IN JAPAN. Acta Hortic. 100, 75-86
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1980.100.10
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1980.100.10

Acta Horticulturae