Using indoor plants and natural elements to positively impact occupants of residential aged-care facilities

T.L. Scott, B.M. Masser, N.A. Pachana
Accumulated research points to the therapeutic effects of including outdoor gardens in aged-care facilities, yet few facilities do so. Space and financial constraints are the major barriers to including them. Aspects of the indoor environment of residential aged-care facilities, such as they being too noisy, odorous, and lacking in warm interpersonal contact, with long hospital-like corridors help to define a sick role rather than create a home-like atmosphere. This pilot study examined the effect of an indoor simulated garden installation in a residential aged care facility that included visual, auditory and olfactory stimuli. Pre- and post-measures of residents' satisfaction with their living environment and social engagement were analysed. The results demonstrate that introducing elements of nature, such as plants, into the indoor environment is a highly affordable way for facilities to create a homely atmosphere and capitalise on the therapeutic effects of nature.
Scott, T.L., Masser, B.M. and Pachana, N.A. (2016). Using indoor plants and natural elements to positively impact occupants of residential aged-care facilities. Acta Hortic. 1121, 7-12
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1121.2
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1121.2
nursing homes, long-term care, therapeutic horticulture, indoor gardens, biophilia, older adults
English

Acta Horticulturae