A PERSPECTIVE ON THE AUSTRALIAN WALNUT INDUSTRY BY THE INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

H.H. Adem
Australia is a large, dry continent with few major rivers and many fragile soils. To address these disadvantages, Australian researchers have found innovative ways to increase horticultural productivity and to protect the environment. Examples are the Tatura Soil Management System, Regulated Deficit Irrigation, Partial Rootzone Drying, Integrated Pest Management and the Tatura Trellis. On the positive side, many parts of Australia have large areas of available land, high levels of solar radiation, long growing seasons and few pests and diseases of walnuts (Juglans regia). Presently, Australia imports 96% of its annual consumption or around 8,500 tonnes of in-shell equivalent walnuts each year. The current production of Australian walnuts is around 500 tonnes but in the next 5 years this is expected to increase to over 10,000 tonnes. In the last decade, walnut plantings have risen sharply from 500 ha to around 3000 ha with orchards ranging in size from 1 ha to >700 ha. Victoria has an estimated 1600 ha, Tasmania 650 ha, New South Wales has over 1600 ha and the balance in South Australia and Western Australia. Following the success of the almond industry in Australia, walnuts offer farmers considerable scope for diversification from traditional crops and some relief from drought and water reform policies. This can be achieved by increased tree densities, soil management, intensive tree training, improved rootstocks/cultivars, efficient micro-irrigation, pest & disease management and mechanisation.
Adem, H.H. (2010). A PERSPECTIVE ON THE AUSTRALIAN WALNUT INDUSTRY BY THE INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT MANAGER . Acta Hortic. 861, 49-56
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2010.861.5
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2010.861.5
Juglans regia, Juglans hindsii, paradox, soil management, propagation, rootstocks, tree training, irrigation scheduling
English

Acta Horticulturae