THE TRANSMISSION AND MANAGEMENT OF TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS IN A GREENHOUSE ENVIRONMENT

T. Losenge, J.E. Faust , S.W. Scott
Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) is a troublesome virus in greenhouse production. Experiments were carried out to investigate the ease with which the virus spreads from infected greenhouse-grown plants to non-infected plants through workers clothing and cutting tools. Two tobacco cultivars (Nicotiana tabacum ‘White Burley’ and ‘Samsun NN’) were used as indicator plants. Two commonly used clothing materials, cotton and high density polyethylene fiber (HDPE), for greenhouse dustcoats and latex for gloves were tested as vehicles for transmission of the virus. Workers’ contact with plants was simulated by creating various contact grades on infected plants followed by contact with healthy plants. The slightest brushing of the materials against infected plants and to healthy ones caused a disease incidence of >70% for cotton, 60% for Latex, and 30% for HDPE. However, cleaning of these materials using various cleaning agents in a simulated laundry cycle eliminated the virus. Several disinfectant materials were effective at reducing TMV transmission depending on the concentration and time of exposure.
Losenge, T., Faust , J.E. and Scott , S.W. (2012). THE TRANSMISSION AND MANAGEMENT OF TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS IN A GREENHOUSE ENVIRONMENT. Acta Hortic. 937, 85-90
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.937.9
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.937.9
benzoic acid, disinfectant, Menno-Florades, milk, Nicotiana tabacum, sodium hydroxide, sodium hypochlorite, trisodium phosphate
English

Acta Horticulturae